The Puzzle Piece

Ya’ll know about all those “National Day of (insert random thing here)” holidays that they announce for novelty’s sake on the radio and those one-a-day calendars? Well, today happens to be National Puzzle Day.

Do you know about the puzzle piece being the recognized symbol for Autism awareness? Here’s some information about it.

– In 1999 it was adopted as the UNIVERSAL symbol for Autism Awareness.

– The puzzle pieces themselves represent the complexity of the Autism Spectrum.

– The different colors of the puzzle pieces usually seen on ribbons and logos represent the diversity of the individuals that have Autism.

A lot of agencies use the puzzle piece pattern in logos, merchandise, etc. because of all of these reasons. When I was having a graphic designed for the “Take That, Autism!” logo it was a no-brainer for me to have it include multi-colored puzzle pieces.

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In case you weren’t aware, the puzzle piece used to represent Autism isn’t received well by everyone. Some individuals argue the following:

– use of the puzzle piece can imply that individuals with Autism are confused or incomplete

– it implies that there is a missing piece when many individuals with Autism don’t feel that their lives are missing anything.

In fairness, if you go back a few decades from the 1990’s when the first puzzle piece was used to represent Autism for an Autism society in the 1960’s, it was done so with a graphic of a weeping child on top of the puzzle piece because “children with Autism are always suffering.”

I have an opinion on the debate.

I think that what the puzzle piece perhaps implied 50 years ago versus what it represents today has evolved. I feel that a puzzle piece is part of a larger unit. Each piece comes together and unites. If I look at a graphic of interlocking puzzle pieces, I feel like I’m look at a picture of unity. And I can’t argue against unity. Ever. I also hope that in 15 years, when my son sees these puzzle pieces that represent something he will have to work harder because of everyday for the rest of his life, that if I have raised him well, he will simply think, “How great that my mom worked so hard to find a group of people that could put all the pieces together for me to get me where I am today.”

Also, there are a lot of other things going on that bother me more than what a puzzle piece could or could not be interpreted as. I really feel a push for everyone to use people-first language. I had someone comment on my Facebook months and months ago, “I didn’t know you had an autistic son.” Honest reaction? I prickled. I rolled my eyes, let out a breath, and simply replied “Yes, I have a son who happens to have Autism.” I also have trouble with the emphasis of and the need to assign low, mod, high functioning levels that have inconsistent and fairly arbitrary criteria that vary from one association or governing body to the next. Lastly, I’d love for the push of using the term “pre-verbal” versus “non-verbal” in more conversations with parents of little ones. Prognosis is almost impossible to predict at the preschool age- using such definitive and severe terminology is- in all honesty- just something else for us to obsess and worry about and then we’re more likely to simply not do ANYTHING because when you have a child with special needs, you have to fight hard not to feel defeated. Let’s not feel defeated by lexicon before we ever get a chance to get off the ground. There’s a quote that I read years ago that likely is my favorite quote of all time that I think works well here:

“Everyone is a genius. But if you judge a fish on its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing it is stupid.”

– Albert Einstein

In summary, the puzzle piece for Autism has a rich history. And as with anything, it will never satisfy everyone. This mama supports the use of the puzzle piece and the ideology is currently represents, but I also respect the opinion of those that might not.

Regardless, I think we’re all really just looking forward to the day when the only puzzle pieces we really need to care about are the ones that get lost under the couch, because that will signify that we have been successful in uniting our children.

Have a good day, everybody. Do a jigsaw puzzle or two!