The Words Unspoken

From the title I imagine you thought this post was going to be about having a child with nonverbal Autism. Nope! Plot twist.

We had plans today but some crud swept through here preventing us from going. We managed to work up enough good vibes to go to Lowes and the grocery store though. Running errands with Caleb isn’t easy, but we’re not people who take the easy way out anyways.

And I was so excited when it was over! I thought he did an amazing job! We were in Lowes for 35 minutes and Caleb sat in the bottom of the cart and built Lego people and was very quiet and happy as long we we were walking around the store. Which we did while I bombarded him with household vocabulary through the different departments. Then we went to Aldi and he continued building Lego people in the bottom of the cart while we went through the aisles. We passed the bread section, he took my hand and pointed to the wall of carbs, then put my hand directly on what he wanted as we walked by it all slowly. So, to reinforce awesome communication, I opened up the Sweet Hawaiian Rolls and he ate 3 until we checked out and were loaded in the car. No screeches, no attempts to leave the cart, no stomps- it was peaceful and nice and fun.

But when I was recanting to someone later about how proud I was of him, I got the wind taken 0ut of my sails a little. I was posed with the question, “but how successful was itĀ really?”. They proceeded to tell me that Lowes was only successful because I kept the cart moving and Aldi was only successful because I gave him food. And that I wouldn’t have been able to do it by myself because I needed my husband to take Ari and get the needed items and I had to have a cart dedicated to making Caleb my sole responsibility.

I have noticed that things like this being said to me is becoming a trend. Sometimes, people bring things he has trouble with to my attention. Like I don’t make a 15 category lesson plan every single day for him to address his difficulties and delays and don’t know what he needs. Sometimes, people also only compliment him in relation to his Autism. “Thats so great! When would he have done that if he didn’t have Autism?” or “For a kid with Autism, he worked that puzzle really quickly.” There’s this whole big category of things people could say that goes largely unsaid by 90% of people we come into contact with. The words left unspoken are all the things he’s doing well or all the amazing things about him that have nothing to do with Autism. Don’t tell me what he’s struggling with, tell me what you notice he’s rocking out on. Compliment him on his achievements because he achieved them- not because he achieved them despite Autism. Yes, it is true that I have a large social media presence that revolves around the fact he has Autism- but that is not for him. That is for me and for other parents on this journey and to educated and promote acceptance. If you know me- likeĀ really know me- then you know I talk about Caleb allll the time and it is rarely in a context that has anything to do with Autism.

If 3 Lego men, a tour of Lowes, and a $1.75 package of Sweet Hawaiian rolls is all it takes for us to run hours worth of errands successfully, SO BE IT. He’s 4. This is obviously not the end goal. But before you get where you want to be, you have to simply start where you are. And this is where we are today, so this is where we’re starting.

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Love, Autism, and Hawaiian Rolls,


Holler at me!