Apraxia and Autism: Where to Start

Because I think I’m generally hilarious, I decided that an unofficial subcategory of “Take That, Autism!” shall be “In Your Face, Apraxia!” because we’ve got more than one challenge on our plate.

I’ve talked to you about what Childhood Apraxia of Speech is and incidence rates of it in children with Autism here. Now, I want to tell you about what we’ve been working on and how to prepare ourselves for “true” intervention for apraxia.

Caleb says so many things that aren’t jargon, but true productions that are just that unintelligible. Because apraxia. Apraxia makes vowels beastly to form, consonants the trickiest of the tricksters, and then when you go to put those Consonants and Vowels into various CV, VC, CVCV, CVC, etc. sound combinations it all can become a very “say what?” situation. And that’s when you’re able to imitate things verbally on a 1:1 compliant ratio. But what about when you have Autism and are 3 and your verbal skills are just starting to develop and your ratio of imitating a single word is more of a 20:1 input/output ratio? And that’s just to maybe label…..NOT to produce specific sounds in specific sound patterns.

But your child wants to try. You can tell. They want to try to say more things. Where do you start? Here’s where we’re at.

Imitation Hierarchy

There are sooooo many things kids imitate before they imitate at the word level. Here’s the breakdown:

– Gross Motor Movements (jumping, kicking, etc. and then expanding to movements with objects such as rolling cars)

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Fine Motor Movements (clapping, motions to songs, playing with small objects and tools, etc.)

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– Oral Motor Movements (blowing, sticking out tongue, kisses, etc.)

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– Imitation of nonsense or environmental sounds (moo, vroom, etc.)

– Imitation of single sounds and simple words

I could not expect Caleb to say “car” if he wasn’t rolling a car across the floor or knew that it went “vroom.” And this hierarchy is not profound. It’s typical language development, really. The difference is that in typically developing kids, the first 4 steps usually don’t need to be “taught”. You probably don’t know when your child started imitating actions, play, animal sounds, etc. because they just kind of did it. Everything with Autism takes more work , more time, and a lot of times formal intervention to learn. Caleb did not imitate rolling a ball. It was taught. He didn’t start imitating motions to songs until last summer right before he turned 3. And it took a lot of watching YouTube song videos and hand-over-hand until he knew his own head, shoulders, knees, and toes. You can’t just look at Caleb and say “stick out your tongue”. It has to be this very elaborate back and forth in front of a mirror where ridiculous faces are made and you will ultimately end up getting lizard licked. Right now we’re teeter tottering between imitating nonsense sounds, single sounds, and 1 syllable words. Caleb can do some solid “ahhhhhhh”, “eeeeeee”, “oooooo” imitations to practice vowels and early developing consonants are coming through, but we are not ready to imitate sounds at the word level. We’ll get there, but it’s a marathon, not a sprint.

I wanted to review a solid imitation hierarchy because when we have 4, 5, 6, year olds who are not yet talking it can be very instinctive to just throw words at them and hope they stick. But imitation of movements, actions, and sounds are a crucial part of development. And if those skills didn’t develop, they need to go back and be addressed and facilitated. That does not mean; however, that you should not work on talking about all of the things all of the time. While you’re working on learning actions, talk about them. When you’re playing trucks, make truck sounds. You’ll get some back sometimes and that’s awesome. You don’t want to walk before you crawl. And I know parents get jazzed and bragged “my child didn’t crawl, they went straight to walking and walk just fine!” but I promise you don’t want that. Yes, maybe they’re walking now but if they never learned that crawling step, there could be implications one day of never having learned the proper skills needed for appropriate visual-spatial recognition, motor coordination leading to good handwriting, and a host of other things (which is a whole other post for a whole other day). Same principle applies here. Imitating actions contributes to increased attention to task, appropriate play development, improved eye contact and social interaction, etc. Do you want to skip straight to talking and skip all those other important developmental milestones? Probably not. No matter what your child’s age, it’s never too late to go back and start working on those skills.

Please stay tuned for future updates on Caleb and our Apraxia-Autism interventions (that will challenge mommy’s creativity and ingenuity) as we find the strategies and approaches that he’s going to respond best to. Thanks for being a part of our journey.

Love, Autism, and Apraxia, everybody. Here’s to the feeling of satisfaction we’ll have when we end up where we’re going to end up and the patience for us to hold on tight until we do.

Erin

Holler at me!